Indigenous Reconciliation Fund

What is the Indigenous Reconciliation Fund (IRF)?

The Indigenous Reconciliation Fund, a national initiative, was established to accept donations from 73 Catholic entities across the country, and to advance healing and reconciliation initiatives, fulfilling the $30 million financial commitment made by Canada’s Bishops in September 2021.

The fund seeks to support projects that are determined locally, in collaboration with First Nations, Métis and Inuit partners. The Indigenous Reconciliation Fund has established the following criteria for grant applications:

  • Healing and reconciliation for communities and families;
  • Culture and language revitalization;
  • Education and community building; and
  • Dialogues for promoting indigenous spirituality and culture.

The fund has been designed to meet the highest standards of transparency and good governance and is overseen by a Board of Directors made up of Indigenous leaders.

To date, the Indigenous Reconciliation Fund has raised $14,099,813.74, putting the fund on track for its five-year, $30 million commitment. To learn more about the National Indigenous Reconciliation Fund, visit their website at www.irfund.ca

How is the Archdiocese involved with the Indigenous Reconciliation Fund?

In February 2022, the Archdiocese of Edmonton announced its commitment of $3.2 million over five years. In addition, many people have expressed their desire to make a personal contribution toward this effort. There were two special parish collections on the weekends of March 5-6 and March 12-13, 2022. Those who wish to continue to donate may make a gift online.

Which projects have been approved?

A list of 34 projects within the Archdiocese of Edmonton can be found on the national Indigenous Reconciliation Fund site. The projects are categorized by three pillars:

  • Healing and Reconciliation for Communities and Families;
  • Culture and Language Revitalization;
  • Education and Community Building.

Project summaries are added every month as details become available.

Thirty-four projects within the area of the Archdiocese of Edmonton support a national commitment towards healing and reconciliation with First Nation, Inuit and Métis people.

The Indigenous Reconciliation Discernment Circle, whose members are local indigenous leaders, has recommended the projects and initiatives focused on healing and reconciliation for communities and families; culture and language revitalization; as well as education and community building. Those projects have been approved by the national Indigenous Reconciliation Fund committee.

How will my donation be utilized in working with the national Indigenous Reconciliation Fund?

The fund seeks to support projects that are determined locally, in collaboration with First Nations, Métis and Inuit partners. The IRF has established the following criteria for grant applications:

  • Healing and reconciliation for communities and families;
  • Culture and language revitalization;
  • Education and community building;
  • Dialogues for promoting indigenous spirituality and culture; and
  • Youth leadership.

The fund has been designed to meet the highest standards of transparency and good governance and is overseen by a Board of Directors made up of Indigenous leaders.

Local Catholic dioceses identify the priority of meaningful reconciliation work as determined by local Indigenous groups and organizations. An Indigenous Reconciliation Discernment Circle has identified projects within the area of the Archdiocese of Edmonton, review and approve applications and ensure transparency and good governance.


Discernment Circle

An Indigenous Reconciliation Discernment Circle has identified projects within the area of the Archdiocese of Edmonton, and reviewed and approved applications to ensure transparency and good governance.

 

 

“History cannot be erased, but together we can look forward to – and help create – a better future,” said Cam Alexis, chair of the Indigenous Reconciliation Discernment Circle and a member of the Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation.

“I think the spirituality and culture is very important because that is part of the Church’s reconciliation as well. It is to recognize that as a holistic way of healing. Even the Pope visited us last summer, and all of this is the concept of healing and coming back to the Church as well for prayer.”

The Indigenous Reconciliation Discernment Circle in the Archdiocese of Edmonton is Indigenous-led, with representation from First Nations, Metis and Inuit partners. The Circle  is also supported by an Elder, former Samson Cree Nation Chief Victor Buffalo.


Contact

If you have any questions, please e-mail Marion.Haggarty-France@caedm.ca


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